By Keith Nobles

 

Quite a few people do not quite get why the German army in WW II was so successful early on in the war – consistently routing opponents who had superior numbers of men, tanks, artillery and even airplanes than the Germans had.

 

The word Blitzkrieg gets thrown around perhaps without a real understanding of what that meant: while their enemy may have numerical superiority, that superiority was strung out over defending a long line of perhaps hundreds of miles. The Germans would concentrate overwhelming superiority in a single place on that line, punch a hole in the line, and then as rapidly as possible pour armored and motorized troops through that hole and before the enemy even fully realized what had happened – the Germans would be fifty miles in the rear and the other side would be trying to reform their lines and it would all be chaos – chaos which would lead to further disaster for the defense. The Germans were the first to master the concept of armor, motorized infantry, artillery and air power all at the same place at the same time working as a team – the British, Americans and Soviets would figure this out later in the war but early on these armies had neither the doctrine nor the practice to do this as the Germans did.

 

This is not merely a history lesson but applicable to arguments people make today – that the United States has superior defense spending, etc. hence we are ‘safe.’

 

The problem with that is, local concentration of overwhelming superiority by an enemy followed by chaos on the defense – much as the Germans did to the French and Soviets.

 

That we have ‘more’ is no more useful by itself to us than it was to the French in 1940.

 

More to defending the United States than just having ‘more’…

 

Read more at keithnobles.com

Keith Nobles novel, Our Dogs Did Not Bark, is now available on Amazon.

Buy it here

 

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