https://media.tegna-media.com/assets/WBIR/images/53f31875-a750-4149-b088-b6352f769d79/53f31875-a750-4149-b088-b6352f769d79_750x422.jpg

Voting Dolly in for president is perfectly legal in the state of Tennessee. That doesn’t mean the vote actually counted, though.

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — What do Dolly Parton, Baby Yoda, and Peyton Manning all have in common?

Knox County voters wanted them for President of the United States in 2020.

These represent just a few of the names written down as write-in candidates, which is someone whose name does not appear on the ballot and must be written down by voters.

Most states, including Tennessee, do allow voters to write-in the name of a candidate who does not appear on the ballot.

Write-in candidate data obtained by 10News gives a glimpse – sometimes hilarious, sometimes sobering – into which candidates folks who couldn’t bring themselves to write down Biden or Trump thought would do a better job.

Sometimes, these write-in candidates are living. Sometimes they are dead. Sometimes they are fictional.

There were some politicians thrown in the mix, like Bernie Sanders and Tim Burchett, who were also written down.

Living or dead, the votes were for naught. Thirty-three states will only accept votes for write-in candidates who have officially registered with the state.

That includes Tennessee.

For this year’s election, a potential write-in candidate in Tennessee would have had to file a completed Certification of Write-In Candidacy in order to be counted for the office of U.S. President no later than noon and fifty days beforehand, according to the Tennessee Secretary of State.

By and large though, Knox County voters went with who was on the ballot.

President Trump carried Knox County, but the city of Knoxville went decisively blue by 12,000 votes, according to WBIR’s Cole Sullivan.

You can read more about that divide in Knox County here.

RELATED: Urban vs. rural divide separates red from blue in Knox County—and the country

Source:  WBIR News LOCAL